Standardization

Identification by Radio frequency (RFID) is a technology that existed for more than half a century, however, in recent years, its potential has been taking advantage of to identify products and facilitate the logistic processes in which they operate both manufacturers and retailers within the sectors of consumer goods. Products by RFID or Radio frequency identification is a method that identifies reliably items using radio waves. The great advantage in relation to bar code technology is that the laser beams must see barcode to read it. On the other hand, radio waves do not require this line of reading and can be placed in different forms of texture of materials, such as corrugated cardboard or plastics. Electronic product (EPC) code is a unique number designed to uniquely identify any object at the global level, number which is also stored on an RFID TAG. The EPC is understood as the Standardization of RFID, leading within their standard aspects such as software, information systems and frequencies of operation, etc. The electronic code of product (EPC) is the next generation of bar codes, basically the EPC is an encoding scheme developed by the Auto-ID Center that can uniquely identify an individual item, whether it is to be an article of consumption, box, pallet, good logistical or virtually anything else. Instead of being printed on paper as happens today with the barcode system, this number is inserted within an electronic tag which can be detected using radio (RIF) waves.

This allows you to locate or track products throughout the supply chain and read these EPCs at a distance and out of direct line of reading. These technologies promise to improve and accelerate the operation of inventory, logistics in supply chains and payment processes and necessarily in the long-term it will do to improve the way they do business. RFID brings value to supply chains with new technologies and new business processes resulting from these technological changes in this first decade of the twenty-first century.

Hackers and Technology

But here's the big difference in question. The crackers (crack = destroy) are always looking for people who disturb others, pirated software protected by law, destroy very complex systems by providing powerful virus, etc. Those are the crackers. Unruly teenagers quickly learn this complex job. They differ with hackers because they do not have any ideology when making their "jobs." Instead, the main objective of the hackers is not to become criminals, but "fighting against an unjust system" used as a weapon system itself. Their war is quiet but very compelling. The advancement of the information age has introduced new terms in the vocabulary of every day.

One of these words, hacker has to do with the crime. Everyone is familiar with the stories of those who manage to enter the computer corporations. But we have the impression that the term "hacker" is one of the worst understood, applied and, therefore, used in the information age. blogspot. com / popular culture defines hackers as those who, with the help of their computer knowledge they gain access to the computers of the banks and bureaus of the government.

Dive for information that is not theirs, steal expensive software and perform transactions in a bank account to another. Criminologists, on the other hand, describe the hackers in less flattering terms. Donn Parker calls them "rapists Electronic and August Bequai describes them as "electronic vandals." Both, but assert that the activities of hackers are illegal, evade ability called "computer crime". Make a clear distinction between the hacker to perform their activities for fun and the employee who suddenly decides to do something wrong.

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